Who is Martin Luther King addressing in his speech?

“I Have a Dream” is a public speech that was delivered by American civil rights activist Martin Luther King Jr. during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on August 28, 1963, in which he called for civil and economic rights and an end to racism in the United States.

Who is Martin Luther King addressing in his I Have a Dream Speech?

We reflect on his life and message by revisiting his celebrated I Have a Dream speech in its entirety. African American civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. addresses the crowd at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., where he gave his “I Have a Dream” speech on Aug.

What was Martin Luther King’s message in his speech?

I Have a Dream, speech by Martin Luther King, Jr., that was delivered on August 28, 1963, during the March on Washington. A call for equality and freedom, it became one of the defining moments of the civil rights movement and one of the most iconic speeches in American history. Location: Washington, D.C.

His speech was pivotal because it brought civil rights and the call for African-American rights and freedom to the forefront of Americans’ consciousness. It is estimated that over 250,000 people attended the march, which also received a great deal of national and international media attention.

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What is the hope and dream of Martin Luther King?

Martin Luther King, Jr.’s hope is for African Americans to be able to participate in mainstream American society. The speech references both American history and American culture to illustrate examples of what African Americans wanted—the American Dream and unalienable rights.

What issues does Martin Luther King’s speech address?

“I Have a Dream” is a public speech delivered by American civil rights activist Martin Luther King Jr. during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on August 28, 1963, in which he calls for an end to racism in the United States and called for civil and economic rights.

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