Do Christians believe in purgatory?

Purgatory (Latin: purgatorium, borrowed into English via Anglo-Norman and Old French) is, according to the belief of some Christians (mostly Catholics), an intermediate state after physical death for expiatory purification.

Is Purgatory mentioned in the Bible?

We know the word Purgatory is not in the Bible, but also the story of Susanna, Chapter 13 of Daniel, is omitted in the King James Bible, and we could go on. The Old Testament Jewish prayed for the dead as we do today. Remember, God said one speck on the soul doesn’t get into heaven, it has to be cleaned.

What religion will go to heaven?

Jehovah’s Witnesses believe that heaven is the dwelling place of Jehovah and his spirit creatures. They believe that only 144,000 chosen faithful followers (“The Anointed”) will be resurrected to heaven to rule with Christ over the majority of mankind who will live on Earth.

Is limbo in the Bible?

The concept of Limbo of the Patriarchs is not spelled out in Scripture, but is seen by some as implicit in various references.

How many people can go to heaven?

Based on their understanding of scriptures such as Revelation 14:1-4, Jehovah’s Witnesses believe that exactly 144,000 faithful Christians go to heaven to rule with Christ in the kingdom of God.

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Who will not go to heaven?

He then who does not confess Christ, or does not walk according to His word, shall not enter into the kingdom of heaven. Chrysostom: He said not he that doth My will, but the will of my Father, for it was fit so to adapt it in the mean while to their weakness.

How long is purgatory?

A Spanish theologian from the late Middle Ages once argued that the average Christian spends 1000 to 2000 years in purgatory (according to Stephen Greenblatt’s Hamlet in Purgatory). But there’s no official take on the average sentence.

Where does limbo come from?

The word is of Teutonic origin, meaning “border” or “anything joined on.” The concept of limbo probably developed in Europe in the Middle Ages but was never defined as a church dogma, and reference to it was omitted from the official catechism of the church that was issued in 1992.

Diary of a Protestant