Frequent question: How many died in the French wars of religion?

Between 2,000,000 and 4,000,000 people were killed as a result of war, famine, and disease, and at the conclusion of the conflict in 1598, Huguenots were granted substantial rights and freedoms by the Edict of Nantes, though it did not end hostility towards them.

How many people died in the French religious wars?

Robert J. Knecht The French Religious Wars, 1562-1598 (2000): Deaths during the wars estimated at 2,000,000 to 4,000,000.

Is France Protestant or Catholic?

The major religions practised in France include Christianity (about 47% overall, with denominations including Catholicism, various branches of Protestantism, Eastern Orthodoxy, Armenian Orthodoxy), Islam, Judaism, Buddhism, Hinduism, and Sikhism amongst others, making it a multiconfessional country.

Who won the Thirty Years war?

The war finally ended with the Peace of Westphalia in 1648. Austria was defeated, and its hopes for control over a Catholic Europe came to nothing. The Peace of Westphalia set the religious and political boundaries for Europe for the next two centuries.

What were the causes and results of France’s war of religion?

The French Civil War, or French Wars of Religion were a series of wars fought from 1562 to 1598. They were primarily caused by the conflicts between Protestants and Catholics. … The consequences were that the French monarchy was temporarily weakened and that France was solidified as a predominantly Catholic nation.

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Why did Catholics go to war against the Huguenots?

The war began when the Catholic League convinced King Henry III to issue an edict outlawing Protestantism and annulling Henry of Navarre’s right to the throne. For the first part of the war, the royalists and the Catholic League were uneasy allies against their common enemy, the Huguenots.

Is France an atheist country?

In France, about half of the population is not religious or atheist — despite the fact that it is generally considered to be the birthplace of Western secularism. With 65 percent, Israel has surprisingly many citizens who consider themselves not religious or to be atheists.

Diary of a Protestant